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Posts for category: Pediatric Safety

By The Child & Adolescent Clinic
September 01, 2021
Category: Pediatric Safety
Hand, Foot and Mouth DiseaseHand, foot and mouth disease isn’t a childhood infection that’s often discussed but should be. After all, this communicable viral infection is more common in young children than most people realize. If you are concerned about hand, foot and mouth disease, or would simply like to know more, your pediatrician can certainly provide you with the information you need. In the meantime, here are some FAQS that can help you get the facts on this contagious infection.

Is hand, foot and mouth disease dangerous?

While the name might make this condition sound rather frightening, the truth is that many kids under the age of five develop this illness. This is because these viruses are quite contagious. Even though this most often impacts young children, this infection can also present in older children, teens, and even adults.

What are the symptoms?

The incubation period for hand, foot and mouth disease is about 3-6 days from exposure. At first, symptoms may appear mild and look similar to the common cold (e.g. runny nose, fever, and sore throat); however, blisters will then start to develop within the mouth and on the body (often the palms of the hands and soles of the feet).

How is it diagnosed?

A diagnosis is often made by a pediatrician through a simple physical evaluation. They will go through your child’s medical history, examine the blisters and ask questions about your child’s symptoms to determine whether this could be hand, foot and mouth disease. Some testing may be performed to rule out other conditions.

How is hand, foot and mouth disease treated?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a medication that will get rid of hand, foot and mouth disease. Like most viral infections, the infection just has to run its course; however, there are certain things your pediatrician may prescribe or recommend that you do to ease your child’s symptoms. For example, ibuprofen may be recommended to help ease the pain as well as your child’s fever. Of course, it’s always a good idea to speak with your pediatrician before you start your child on any medication, even over-the-counter medications.

If your child develops symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease it’s important that you see your pediatrician as soon as possible for an evaluation, as they will want to make sure that this is truly what’s causing their symptoms.
By Child & Adolescent Clinic
October 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Safety
Tags: Baby Care   Infants   Newborn Baby   Car Seat  

Bringing Your Newborn HomePreparing yourself for childbirth is important, but what about when you first leave the hospital with your newborn? With pregnancy taking a full nine months, expectant parents need all the time they can to prepare themselves for the big event. However, in the rush to paint the nursery and buy baby furniture, you may have overlooked some of the essentials of bringing your newborn baby home. There is no official instruction manual for becoming a parent, but with help from your pediatrician, you can ensure continual health throughout your child’s lifetime. 

Leaving the Hospital

Often, moms-to-be will pack clothes for the trip home before even going to the hospital. Plan to bring loose-fitting clothing for yourself, because you most likely won’t fit in your pre-pregnancy clothes. Babies are frequently overdressed for their first trip home. In warm weather, it is practical to dress your baby in a t-shirt and diaper and to wrap them in a baby blanket. Hats are not necessary, but they can be a cute finishing touch, especially for the first picture in the hospital. 

If it is cold, add a snowsuit and an extra blanket for your baby. Chances are much better that you will bring home a calm, contented baby if you do not spend too much time at the hospital trying to dress your newborn in a complicated outfit that requires pushing and pulling your baby’s arms and legs. If you have not already made arrangements with your baby’s pediatrician, make sure to ask when the baby’s first checkup should be scheduled before you leave the hospital.  

The Car Ride Home

The most important item for the tip home with your newborn is a proper child safety seat (car seat). Every state requires parents to have a safety seat before leaving the hospital because it is one of the best ways to protect your baby. Even for a short trip, it is never safe for one of you to hold your baby in your arms while the other drives. Your baby could be pulled from your arms and thrown against the dashboard by a quick stop.  

Infant-only seats are designed for rear-facing use only and fit infants better than convertible seats. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants and toddlers ride in rear-facing seats until they are 2-years-old or until they have reached the maximum weight and height limits recommended by the manufacturer. Never put a rear-facing infant or convertible seat in the front seat of your car – always use the rear seat.

Complications

If your child becomes ill shortly after you bring them home from the hospital, you want to have a good working relationship with a doctor you trust and respect. You have nine months to plan, so come in and talk to us! Opening a dialogue with your new pediatrician is the best way to start what will be a long relationship based in keeping your child healthy and happy.

With your baby at home, watch for these signs that it is time to call your pediatrician:

  • Breathing faster or irregular
  • Notice blueness or a darkness on the lips or face
  • Newborn has a fever
  • Newborn’s body temperature has dropped
  • See signs of dehydration
  • Baby’s belly button or circumcision area looks infected

Although most babies remain perfectly healthy after they are discharged from the hospital, it is important to watch for any signs of illness and take your child to your pediatrician for evaluation within a day or two of leaving the hospital.  

By Child & Adolescent Clinic
July 05, 2017
Category: Pediatric Safety
When you are not able to watch your child closely, many moms or dads will place their child in a playpen. While you might think this is a safe place for your child, think again. A playpen can also pose risks
playpen safety for your child and be dangerous under certain circumstances. With the guidance of your pediatrician, lets take a look at ways you can prevent mishaps from occurring with your child while they are in a playpen. According to your pediatrician, make sure that:
  • Netting has a small weave without any tears.
  • The drop side is up and securely locked.
  • The rails and padding are in good condition.
  • Toys are not strung from the playpen
  • You don’t use an accordion-style fence as a play yard.
Playpens are popular because they allow parents to put their baby down with the knowledge that their little one can’t wander off. By understanding how to protect your baby, playpens can remain a safe place. Your pediatrician offers helpful tips to help keep your baby safe at all times.